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OFF BEAT: Studio behind 'Godzilla' remake hoping to squash lawsuit

June 4, 2014 - 3:14pm


In a manner befitting the legendary radioactive lizard, the studio behind the recent remake of “Godzilla” is attempting to squash a legal dispute over the film’s finances.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Legendary Pictures L.L.C. filed a motion this week in a last-ditch attempt to dismiss a lawsuit from three producers that claim they were unjustly fired from the monster movie.

The producers — Dan Lin, Roy Lee and Doug Davison — sued Legendary in 2013, alleging that the studio improperly removed them from the project in order to avoid paying them agreed-upon producer fees.

Filed in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, Central District, Legendary’s demurrer would “cripple” the producers’ fraud claims, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

In their lawsuit, the producers claim that despite traveling to Japan to secure the rights to the iconic franchise and bringing the project to the studio, they were eventually pushed off the film and denied a percentage of the film’s box office results. Legendary argues that the producers are entitled “at most” to a $25,000 development fee.

Considering that the film has grossed $375 million in worldwide box office since it debut in May, the potential payout to the aggrieved producers could be monstrous.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Legendary Pictures L.L.C. filed a motion this week in a last-ditch attempt to dismiss a lawsuit from three producers that claim they were unjustly fired from the monster movie.

The producers — Dan Lin, Roy Lee and Doug Davison — sued Legendary in 2013, alleging that the studio improperly removed them from the project in order to avoid paying them agreed-upon producer fees.

Filed in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, Central District, Legendary’s demurrer would “cripple” the producers’ fraud claims, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

In their lawsuit, the producers claim that despite traveling to Japan to secure the rights to the iconic franchise and bringing the project to the studio, they were eventually pushed off the film and denied a percentage of the film’s box office results. Legendary argues that the producers are entitled “at most” to a $25,000 development fee.

Considering that the film has grossed $375 million in worldwide box office since it debut in May, the potential payout to the aggrieved producers could be monstrous.

 



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