Login Register Subscribe
Current Issue

Help

BI’s Article search uses Boolean search capabilities. If you are not familiar with these principles, here are some quick tips.

To search specifically for more than one word, put the search term in quotation marks. For example, “workers compensation”. This will limit your search to that combination of words.

To search for a combination of terms, use quotations and the & symbol. For example, “hurricane” & “loss”.

Physical health takes back seat among employee wellness concerns

Reprints

BOSTON — While most workplace wellness programs are designed primarily to improve employees' physical health, employees say physical health is far less important than other elements of their total well-being.

Employees at Watertown, Massachusetts-based Bright Horizons L.L.C. polled in 2014 said physical health and wellness accounted for just 5% of their overall well-being, according to an internal study. Issues in their personal lives accounted for 37% of employees' total well-being; resilience, 24%; and financial wellness, 18%.

Job satisfaction and stress accounted for 9% and 7% of employees' well-being, respectively, according to the study that was presented Thursday during the National Business Group on Health's 29th National Conference for Health, Productivity and Human Capital conference in Boston.

“We're spending a lot of time and a lot of money on physical health,” said Lucy English, a St. Louis-based senior consultant at Horizons Workforce Consulting Inc., a subsidiary of Bright Horizons. “I don't want to understate the importance of physical health, because it does hit our bottom line, but we need to understand it in context.”